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Inquiry Into Beheadings By Militia: Ashraf Ghani

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Dozens of Potential Alzheimer's Meds in the Pipeline

TUESDAY, July 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly three dozen new Alzheimer's drugs may reach the market in the next five years, researchers say.

That includes 27 drugs in phase 3 clinical trials, which are later in the drug review process. It also includes eight drugs in phase 2 clinical trials, according to an analysis by ResearchersAgainstAlzheimer's (RA2) investigators, an UsAgainstAlzheimer's network.

"The Alzheimer's disease pipeline, marred by decades of failures and underinvestment, is due for big victories," said George Vradenburg, UsAgainstAlzheimer's co-founder and chair.

"Thanks to growing investment from industry leaders, we remain cautiously optimistic that the current crop of late-stage Alzheimer's innovations will bring much-needed solutions to families in the near future," he said in a network news release.

A new drug for Alzheimer's hasn't been approved in the United States since 2003 and in Europe since 2002.

"There is no silver bullet when it comes to treating Alzheimer's," said Dr. David Morgan, a founding member of RA2 and a professor of molecular pharmacology and physiology at the University of South Florida.

"The more we learn about the underlying Alzheimer's pathology, the closer we get to a cure for a disease that is an enormous burden on patients, caregivers and global health systems," he added in the release.

About 5.5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. By 2050, the number of cases in the United States could be as high as 16 million, according to the Alzheimer's Association.

Deaths from the disease increased 55 percent between 1999 and 2014, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One major question is whether health care systems worldwide will ensure that people with or at risk of Alzheimer's have access to new treatments.

"Alzheimer's is commonly misdiagnosed, and the United States suffers from a shortage of geriatricians -- issues that will only grow as the baby boomer generation ages," Vradenburg said.

"Private- and public-sector leaders will need to work closely with insurers in the coming years to ensure patients have access to these drugs when they are available," he concluded.

The analysis was scheduled to be presented Tuesday at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in London, England. Information presented at meetings is generally considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

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You probably have to look at imagery of death and dying regularly to stay focused on what really counts in life: great sex before you are gone anyway.

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How men from Africa and Asia can easily migrate to Europe: Western African route

The route between Senegal, Mauritania and Morocco and the Spanish Canary Islands was once the busiest irregular entry point for the whole of Europe, peaking at 32 000 migrants arriving on the islands in 2006.

But the numbers dropped by 60 per cent in 2007 following bilateral agreements between Spain and Senegal and Mauritania, including repatriation agreements. Strengthened border controls, including the installation of the SIVE maritime surveillance system, also helped, along with the Frontex-coordinated Operation Hera.

Migrants on this route were mostly from Morocco and Senegal, with others from Niger, Nigeria and Mali. They generally travelled in long wooden fishing boats, known as cayucos; migrants from Morocco use smaller fishing boats called pateras.

The numbers continued to drop from 2007, until by 2012 there were just 170 arrivals in the Canaries. The figure remained stable for the next two years, although it rose to 874 in 2015.

The Moroccan smuggler operation is not well developed. Sea passages tend to be arranged by individuals working independently, serving clients who have made their own way to the coast rather than using the services of organised networks. Small boats found on Lanzarote containing very small numbers of migrants gave strong indications that drug smuggling was the primary goal of these journeys.

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Will Terrorists Soon Be Using Weapons of Mass Destruction?

March 23, 1999 - There is increasing evidence that terrorist attacks of tomorrow could include the use of poison gases, deadly bacteria, or crude nuclear weapons. This is the major finding of a new book by one of the leading experts on weapons of mass destruction, Council on Foreign Relations Fellow Jessica Stern. This conclusion is backed up by evidence, studies, and interviews.

Sounding what former Secretary of Defense William J. Perry calls "a wake-up call for all Americans," and former National Security Adviser Anthony Lake terms "an important alarm [that he hopes] is widely heard," Dr. Stern warns that the 21st century could witness low-technology terrorist attacks employing chemical, radiological, or biological agents. While the likelihood of mass-casualty attacks is low, governments cannot afford to ignore the danger.

In The Ultimate Terrorists, Dr. Stern cites recent developments that have contributed to this new terrorism:

-- New motivating factors, such as religious conviction or apocalyptic beliefs, have created a new breed of terrorists, unconstrained by traditional ethics or political pressures.

-- The break-up of the Soviet Union has brought nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons components onto the black market and has rendered former Soviet scientists desperate, some of whom may be a source of expertise for terrorists.

-- The Internet is making weapons-related information more accessible to terrorists, including weapons design and poison manuals.

-- Advanced industrial societies are particularly vulnerable to weapons of mass destruction, which are most efficiently used against people living in high concentration.

Drawing on both her Council research and her experience working with the White House to prevent nuclear terrorism, Dr. Stern explains the motivations of terrorists, points out specific circumstances that threaten safety, and offers steps the U.S. and other governments can take to prevent attacks and to mitigate the damage of those that occur. She also discusses the reasons poisons and nuclear materials inspire hysteria among the populace, and how to prevent the public panic that could be as dangerous as an actual attack. Finally, Dr. Stern discusses the need to improve public safety without compromising basic constitutional rights, such as freedom of expression.

Jessica Stern is a Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in Washington, D.C. She is a former director of Russian, Ukrainian, and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

The Council on Foreign Relations, founded in 1921 and based in New York, is a national nonpartisan membership organization and think tank dedicated to fostering America’s understanding of other nations through study and debate.

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